&beyond

The next-level publishing collective

In April 2016 Sophie Lovell co-founded &beyond, an international collective of editors, writers and graphic designers specialising in print and digital publishing.

www.andbeyond.xyz

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Founded in 2016, &beyond is an international collective of editors, writers and graphic designers specialising in print and digital publishing. Comprising the editorial team that brought you uncube,the digital magazine for architecture and beyond, &beyond brings together experience and publishing expertise as well as a world-class, worldwide network of collaborators.
Equally adept working in print or online, with sound, moving images and stills, &beyond specialises in understanding and implementing next level publishing. Transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary, &beyond delivers consulting, concepting and production to the highest standards. No schnick-schnack.

andbeyond.xyz

uncube magazine

Architecture and beyond

From September 2013 to April 2016 Sophie Lovell was Editor-in-Chief of uncube, an award-winning digital magazine about architecture and beyond.

uncubemagazine.com

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uncube, the digital magazine for architecture and beyond.

Between 2012-2016 uncube published 43 themed, monthly magazine issues in a format combining the virtues of print with the convenience of digital. In parallel, uncube ran a blog publishing stories from across the spectrum of architecture, design, art, urbanism and beyond.

uncube’s approach was like no other architecture magazine. The self-imposed editorial mandate: to address topics that went beyond the conventional context of architecture discourse with a critical eye and a clear independent voice. Issues covered subjects ranging from robotics, outer space, acoustics and bioarchitecture to new forms of communities and expo architecture via materials such as bricks, and monographs on the likes of Frei Otto, Zaha Hadid and Charles Correa.

Sophie Lovell’s interviewees during this time included: Zaha Hadid, Greg Lynn, Temple Grandin, Ricardo Scofidio, Eero Koivisto, Werner Sobek, Achim Menges, the architecture cartoonist Klaus and many others. Collaborators and contributors were legion and included Paola Antonelli, Olafur Eliasson, Daniel Charny, Bernard Tschumi, Aaron Betsky and more.

uncube’s digital framework took two years to develop and continued to evolve beyond launch. The design won numerous awards, including Lead Awards Digital Magazine of the Year (2013) and was runner up Webby Awards Web Magazine of the Year in 2014 (pipped to the post by Wired.com).

uncubemagazine.com

uncube magazine

Architecture and beyond

In 2013 Sophie Lovell became Editor-in-Chief of the award-winning digital magazine uncube.

uncube is a digital magazine dedicated to “architecture and beyond” and brings a whole new online magazine typology to the media landscape.

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In September 2013 Sophie Lovell became Editor-in-Chief of the award-winning digital magazine uncube.

uncube is a digital magazine dedicated to “architecture and beyond” and brings a whole new alternative online magazine typology to the media landscape. The magazine’s self-imposed mandate is to address topics that go beyond the conventional context of architecture discourse with quality, integrity, clarity, a critical eye and a clear independent voice.

The uncube blog also delivered selected reports and positions on current discussion topics in the field of architecture – and beyond.

www.uncubemagazine.com

 

 

form 249

In the late eighties digital media experts like the social scientist and author Howard Rheingold spoke of a future in which our realities would be virtual: full immersion escapism into alternate fictional worlds. But we are not submerging ourselves in the virtual, rather the virtual is leaving the device and entering our material world, in…

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In the late eighties digital media experts like the social scientist and author Howard Rheingold spoke of a future in which our realities would be virtual: full immersion escapism into alternate fictional worlds. But we are not submerging ourselves in the virtual, rather the virtual is leaving the device and entering our material world, in the form of GPS guides and sensory reinforcement and instant information access to everything from health monitors to apps that can recognise and name a tune, or keep us posted weather conditions, football scores and our social networks.

In design we are tending towards giving our products extended stories and users access and the ability to manipulate and customise individual products for themselves. Our world has become incredibly complex, yet we are adding to and augmenting that complexity. Why? Is it part of our insatiable thirst for pattern and order or, are we in the throes of handing over management of our environment to our machines? Issue 249 looks at how designers are adapting us to different kinds of user interfaces and coming up with new ways of interaction – reducing the barriers between the user and the device, helping us fit better, more symbiotically, with the technologies of our own making today.

Cover photo: Manuel Barth and Caroline Blanik; Focal theme images by Troika; Autonomous Cars by Jonathan Bell; All Our Virtual Futures by Harald Taglinger, images Stephan Botev; UN Studio / A Shared Future for Architecture by Sophie Lovell, images UN Studio; Discourse: The American Counterculture and the Politics of Design by Fred Turner.


form 248

Generation Grey

The “old” people of today are the hippies, the beatniks, the punks, the rockers, the mods and the ravers of yesterday. They were the first teenagers, the inventors of youth, the rebels without a cause and they are not about to take old age lying down either. Generation Grey are the old young, they are more…

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The “old” people of today are the hippies, the beatniks, the punks, the rockers, the mods and the ravers of yesterday. They were the first teenagers, the inventors of youth, the rebels without a cause and they are not about to take old age lying down either. Generation Grey are the old young, they are more active and more economically powerful than ever before. They have needs and they have demands and they have a voice. Design for Generation Grey is not about telephones with big buttons, it is about empowerment: How do we design for Generation Grey?

Discourse for this issue is the thought-provoking Thinking Design Beyond Singularity by Anne-Marie Willis

 

Cover illustration: Heimann und Schwantes; The Progressive Office by Sophie Lovell; Salone del Mobile 2013 / The Highs and Lows in Milan by Sophie Lovell; Carte Blanche poster by Gesa Hansen and M/M Paris; book review: William Myers’ Bio Design: Nature + Science + Creativity (Thames & Hudson)

form 247

Post Genre Fashion and Design

Since the beginning of modernism, fashion and product design have drifted off along two distinct evolutionary branches. In this issue of form we concentrate on their points of content and overlaps. Susanna Legrenzi looks at strategic Italian marriages between fashion and design houses, the fashion curator Mahret Kupka thinks the unthinkable and discusses a life…

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Since the beginning of modernism, fashion and product design have drifted off along two distinct evolutionary branches. In this issue of form we concentrate on their points of content and overlaps. Susanna Legrenzi looks at strategic Italian marriages between fashion and design houses, the fashion curator Mahret Kupka thinks the unthinkable and discusses a life after fashion, former Grafik editor Angharad Lewis talks to Gareth Hague from Alias about packaging luxury. Stefan Ott interviews Stefan Siegel on the rise and rise of his Not Just A Label fashion platform and Danish designer Mads Dinesen talks to Sophie Lovell about studying and starting out in fashion. We also feature an exclusive interview by Sophie Lovell with James Dyson talking about design, engineering, politics and responsibility and Peter Maxwell enters our debating chamber with his discourse on a New Economy of Form.

Cover: Gerhardt Kellermann and Ana Reivao, styling; Barbara Glasner, dress: Mads Dinesen; contents image: Bjorg Odyssey MMXIII collection, NJAL; The Storyteller by Sophie Lovell, photos: Mali Lazell; James Dyson Interview, Sophie Lovell; The Functional and the Functioning, Rosario Hurtado and Roberto Feo

form 246

Hospitality

The relationship between guest and host is sacrosanct. It is based on trust but it has its roots in power play. Issue 246 of form looks at the business of hospitality: From the giant, air-conditioned ‘data hotels’ hosting memory to the culture of grand hotels, Swiss convalescent care architecture and the rise of the ‘authentic’…

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The relationship between guest and host is sacrosanct. It is based on trust but it has its roots in power play. Issue 246 of form looks at the business of hospitality: From the giant, air-conditioned ‘data hotels’ hosting memory to the culture of grand hotels, Swiss convalescent care architecture and the rise of the ‘authentic’ travel experience from Design Hotels to Airbnb.

 

 

Cover photo: Noshe;  Wilkommen, Bienvenue, Welcome: Frankfurt airport photo story by Noshe; carte blanche poster Apfel Zet and Arabeschi di Latte; Memory Motels by Sophie Lovell

form 245

From Me to We

We had the “Me” generation, is it time now for the sharers and carers? form 245 with a cover design by Cox & Grusenmeyer takes a critical look at sharewashing, open-source design, crowd strategies and do-it-yourself production. We also examine the flip-side of sharing and ask whether copying and stealing can still be considered crimes…

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We had the “Me” generation, is it time now for the sharers and carers? form 245 with a cover design by Cox & Grusenmeyer takes a critical look at sharewashing, open-source design, crowd strategies and do-it-yourself production. We also examine the flip-side of sharing and ask whether copying and stealing can still be considered crimes in today’s post-postmodern world.

 

 

Cover: Cox & Grusenmeyer; The First Istanbul Design Biennale: Sophie Lovell with photos by Ali Taptik, poster: Build and their Twitter network; BIO 23 Ljubljana Design Festival: Sophie Lovell

WerkStadt Vienna

Design Engaging the City

An exhibition showcasing curated collaborations between designers and manufacturers in Vienna.

Curated by Sophie Lovell

MAK Wien
12th Dec 2012 – 17th Mar 2013

Ventura Lambrate Milan
9th – 14th April 2013

NAI Rotterdam
22nd Jun – 15th Sept 2013

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An exhibition showcasing curated collaborations between designers and manufacturers in Vienna. Centuries of craft skills are mixed with new design thinking showing that design can be inspiring to everyone – producer and consumer alike. It is about the soft and hard values of design as a facilitator in bringing people together and enhancing the commercial and creative profile of a city at the same time.

Curated by Sophie Lovell

On behalf of: Vienna Design Week
Location: MAK Vienna

Exhibition Design: Studio Makkink & Bey

Graphic design: Hansje van Halem


form 244

Sustaining Tradition

Issue no. 244 entitled Erneuerbare Tradition: Secrets to a Long Life in Design is the second issue of form magazine to be produced under the editorial leadership of Stephan Ott (Editor-in-Chief) and Sophie Lovell (Executive Editor) The poster was specially designed by Swiss garphic designer Ludovic Balland in response to an 1889 lecture by William Morris….

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Issue no. 244 entitled Erneuerbare Tradition: Secrets to a Long Life in Design is the second issue of form magazine to be produced under the editorial leadership of Stephan Ott (Editor-in-Chief) and Sophie Lovell (Executive Editor) The poster was specially designed by Swiss garphic designer Ludovic Balland in response to an 1889 lecture by William Morris.
www.form.de

 

 

Cover: Brautigam & Rotermund; poster Ludovic Balland & William Morris; Shelf Life interview: Sophie Lovell with Mark Adams at Vitsoe, images Christoph Sagel; Wetzlar Network: text and art direction: Sophie Lovell, photos Christoph Sagel, production assistance: Sebastian Schumacher

WerkStadt Vienna

Design Engaging the City

The exhibition “WerkStadt Vienna: Design Engaging the City” curated by Sophie Lovell had its first showing in Helsinki 6-16th September 2012 as part of the WDC Helsinki and Helsinki Design Week in the Kattilahalli, Suvilahti. Produced by Vienna Design Week in collaboration with MAK Vienna, exhibition design by Rianna Makkink and Michou-Nanon de Bruijin, Studio Makkink & Bey.
Next stop: MAK Vienna 12th December 2012 – 17th March 2013

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form 243

Sophie Lovell is new Executive Editor of form

The German design magazine form, first published in 1957, has a new owner and a new editorial team. No. 243 is the first issue to be produced under the editorial leadership of Stephan Ott (Editor-in-Chief) and Sophie Lovell (Executive Editor). The bilingual German/English magazine is based in Frankfurt and Berlin. www.form.de   Cover illustration: Katrin…

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The German design magazine form, first published in 1957, has a new owner and a new editorial team. No. 243 is the first issue to be produced under the editorial leadership of Stephan Ott (Editor-in-Chief) and Sophie Lovell (Executive Editor).
The bilingual German/English magazine is based in Frankfurt and Berlin.
www.form.de

 

Cover illustration: Katrin Schacke, poster: Heimann und Schwantes with June 14 Sam Chermayeff

Endless issue #1

The Trip Family Traveling

Endless magazine is a new kind of travel magazine from Christiane Bördner, the maker of “I Love You” magazine, and her photographer husband and partner Marcus Gaab. For issue #1 Sophie Lovell compiled the design and art section entitled “Endless Inspiration”.

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Endless Inspiration…

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way”

William Blake

There is a small window of time, when you first arrive at a new place, during which you exist in a heady state of heightened perception. Your focus on the new environment is tightly sharpened and nothing escapes your notice as you absorb and catalogue the wealth of detail in a new reality where your own everyday is replaced by another: Strangely cut date palms filled with gangs of scolding green parakeets, for example, or backs of buildings encrusted with a coral landscape of air conditioners. Stones laid in novel patterns on a pathway or alien fire hydrants by the kerb, exotic smells that you cannot yet place, the typography of shop and street signs, the curve of a door handle, the colour of the litter bins, the shape of a light switch or the pattern on a passing headscarf: everything fascinates, everything is new and the world seems reborn.

The magic of travel is all about taking off the blindfold of habit and routine and opening yourself and your own perception to the incredible beauty to be found in what is most likely someone else’s mundane, everyday reality, then allowing that acquired perception to help you see your own old and familiar in a new light. The magic of works of great art or design, be they most humble or highly sophisticated, is not really much different – all new experience can offer a key to the doors of perception. If your eyes and senses are open beauty is everywhere and inspiration endless…

WerkStadt Vienna

Design Engaging the City

A touring exhibition curated by Sophie Lovell will premiere at the World Design Capital Helsinki 2012 in September 2012 and move on to the MAK Vienna in December 2012

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The exhibition Werkstadt Vienna: Design Engaging the City is about the rediscovery and revitalisation of local urban production workshops. In 2006 Neigungsgruppe Design (Tulga Beyerle, Thomas Geisler, Lilli Hollein) began a programme of pairing young, upcoming designers with traditional producers in the city of Vienna called Passionswege. The aim was to generate new dialogues between design and local manufacture, between the city and its makers and between material and technological expertise and experimental design attitudes. The Passionswege went on to become the foundation of the Vienna Design Week.

Amazing and inspiring projects arose from collaborations between designers such as Tomás Alonso (E), Mark Braun (D), Marco Dessi­ (I), Philippe Malouin (CAN), Max Lamb (GB), mischer-traxler (A), Adrien Rovero (CH) and Maxim Velcovsky (CZ) with traditional firms such as J.&L. Lobmeyr, the Viennese porcelain manufacturer Augarten and the Wiener Silber Manufactur. The results of the collaborations were then displayed in the shops and showrooms of the respective producers around the city and many pieces were to be taken into production or marked the beginning of enduring collaborations between designers and makers.

The initiators have now invited the curator Sophie Lovell and designers Studio Makkink&Bey to explore the results of this collaborative experiment in a touring exhibition, and share the richness, variety and sustainability of such an experimental approach with other cities. The first two stops on the tour will be: the World Design Capital Helsinki 2012 in September 2012 and the MAK Vienna in December 2012.

Wallpaper* Germany Survey 2011

Going Deutsch - How Germany became a design superpower: an 84-page supplement

Every now and then Wallpaper* magazine produces a Germany Special Survey, a magazine within the magazine dedicated to Deutschland. This year it was conceived and edited by Sophie Lovell

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“Everyone has their own stereotypes about Germany: the wealthy European industrial giant; the old fashioned state with dirndls, Oktoberfests, black forests, autobahns, and sausages; the country populated by a hard working Volk with a strange sense of humour that just happen to make rather nice cars and be not too bad at football.

German industry is legendary, but for all its apparent sensible stability it is an industry that is full of variety and driven by change. The automotive moguls devote around one third of their corporate spending annually to research and development – and coming up with ideas that make hybrid look old hat. At the other end of the scale, tiny, mobile start-ups, like the Berlin graphic design companies we surveyed, are changing the shape of the creative industry. Centuries-old firms such as those in the porcelain industry are commissioning new works from conceptual artists and fashion designers, and bespoke furniture manufacturers are tiptoeing along the bleeding edge of the avant-garde.

So with this special supplement we would like to show you the Germany that is risk-taking, adventurous, quirky and forward-thinking. Of course the tradition is still there, along with the quality and precision that we have come to depend upon, but with their future strategies the new generation is using these standards as a springboard for great leaps into the unknown.”

Freak Show catalogue

Strategies for (Dis)Engagement in Design

“Our survival depends upon diversification through mutation. We need conceptual thinkers, lateral thinkers, revolutionaries, explorers, inventors, anarchists, activists, cross-disciplinarians and non-linear agenda-benders”

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A limited edition catalogue edited by Sophie Lovell to go with her exhibition of the same name. With works by: Auger-Loizeau, Pieke Bergmans, Dunne & Raby, El Ultimo Grito, Marti­ Guixé, Stuart Haygarth, Kueng Caputo, Mathieu Lehanneur, Studio Makkink & Bey and Jerszy Seymour.

“Right now design is on a critical path involving a radical shift in the understanding of its role in the development and expression of our society.

As humanity expands to fill all available space; as we invade, occupy and infiltrate every nook and cranny of the natural world and beyond; as technosphere merges with biosphere, the role of the designer is pushed into an increasingly pivotal position. Our environment is not self-sustaining, every detail needs to be designed – constantly. The designer, like the rest of us, is part of an enormously complex system that we ourselves have created. The designer is necessarily immersed in the social, intellectual, technological and political context of our constructed world. Thus the responsibility of designers is one of engagement since they are key agents in the process of its creation and maintenance.

But the system is flawed. It does not function properly: It is unbalanced, wasteful and unfit for survival. To engage within the system is to perpetuate the system. We need thinkers and designers to explore strategies that can generate change and to do that they need to disengage with the system. We need diversification through mutation. We need conceptual thinkers, lateral thinkers, revolutionaries, explorers, inventors, anarchists, activists, cross-disciplinarians and non-linear agenda-benders.

Who will give us what we want? Who will be the map-makers in our complex garden of forking paths? Who will make it possible for us to have and have not? Who will question our right to consume? Who will sweeten the pill and who are the ones that will feed us bitter medicine?

In order to think outside of the box you need to distance yourself from it. Traditionally those who disengage in this way are outsiders ‘freaks’ and traditionally they are suppressed or rejected since they tend to threaten the status quo. But now the status quo is threatening us and we are learning to value and to celebrate “difference”.

Freak Show: Strategies for (Dis)engagement in Design is an exhibition of objects by designers that think differently. In the realm of industrial design, a range of strategies is emerging from designers who have begun to challenge the system. They are the ‘freaks’ who are showing us that design is no longer what we thought it was. They are turning accepted norms on their heads and confronting our preconceptions about design. Their work is about rising to the responsibility of engagement through disengagement and as a result they are giving us an insight into what the world could be like if we can find the courage to accept change.”

Freak Show exhibition

Strategies for (Dis)Engagement in Design curated by Sophie Lovell

“Our survival depends upon diversification through mutation. We need conceptual thinkers, lateral thinkers, revolutionaries, explorers, inventors, anarchists, activists, cross-disciplinarians and non-linear agenda-benders.”

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An exhibition curated and edited by Sophie Lovell. With works by: Auger-Loizeau, Pieke Bergmans, Dunne & Raby, El Ultimo Grito, Martí­ Guixé, Stuart Haygarth, Kueng Caputo, Mathieu Lehanneur, Studio Makkink & Bey and Jerszy Seymour.

Right now design is on a critical path involving a radical shift in the understanding of its role in the development and expression of our society.

As humanity expands to fill all available space; as we invade, occupy and infiltrate every nook and cranny of the natural world and beyond; as technosphere merges with biosphere, the role of the designer is pushed into an increasingly pivotal position. Our environment is not self-sustaining, every detail needs to be designed – constantly. The designer, like the rest of us, is part of an enormously complex system that we ourselves have created. The designer is necessarily immersed in the social, intellectual, technological and political context of our constructed world. Thus the responsibility of designers is one of engagement since they are key agents in the process of its creation and maintenance.

But the system is flawed. It does not function properly: It is unbalanced, wasteful and unfit for survival. To engage within the system is to perpetuate the system. We need thinkers and designers to explore strategies that can generate change and to do that they need to disengage with the system. We need diversification through mutation. We need conceptual thinkers, lateral thinkers, revolutionaries, explorers, inventors, anarchists, activists, cross-disciplinarians and non-linear agenda-benders.

Who will give us what we want? Who will be the map-makers in our complex garden of forking paths? Who will make it possible for us to have and have not? Who will question our right to consume? Who will sweeten the pill and who are the ones that will feed us bitter medicine?

In order to think outside of the box you need to distance yourself from it. Traditionally those who disengage in this way are outsiders ‘freaks’ and traditionally they are suppressed or rejected since they tend to threaten the status quo. But now the status quo is threatening us and we are learning to value and to celebrate ‘difference’.

Freak Show: Strategies for (Dis)engagement in Design is an exhibition of objects by designers that think differently. In the realm of industrial design, a range of strategies is emerging from designers who have begun to challenge the system. They are the ‘freaks’ who are showing us that design is no longer what we thought it was. They are turning accepted norms on their heads and confronting our preconceptions about design. Their work is about rising to the responsibility of engagement through disengagement and as a result they are giving us an insight into what the world could be like if we can find the courage to accept change.

A limited edition catalogue designed by Christiane Bördner accompanies the exhibition.

Studio Hausen

"In Process"

The first publication from Berlin young designers Studio Hausen documenting their process-led furniture design for the Salone del Mobile 2010

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Excerpt:

Hydra – The Genesis of a Chair

The development of the Hydra chair is the graduation project of the designer Jörg Höltje (Studio Hausen) from the University of the Arts in Berlin. It is also the result of an 18-month cooperation with the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU in Chemnitz, Germany.

Höltje’s aim was to design a chair whose form stemmed from observations of the natural forces and functions that give biological organisms their shape and then to create it using an innovative technological process called ‘hydroforming’.

Hydroforming is already used in the automobile and bicycle industries as an economical way of shaping malleable metals and creating lightweight but structurally strong components and joints. After visiting the Fraunhofer Institute, Höltje realised that high-pressure tube hydroforming (IHU) could also facilitate the modelling of free geometric forms from sheet and tubular steel to create a chair with a ‘grown’ organic shape and the collaboration began then and there.

The hydroforming of steel tube works by laying a component filled with fluid in a mould and then altering its shape with a controlled build up of the internal fluid pressure. IHU technology has allowed Höltje to break with the dogma of the continuous diameter of steel tube components; to give the tube a landscape of contours and allow it to branch out. He has liberated the structural form of the tubular steel chair and for the first time created a version that looks like it has grown into shape rather than been bent into it. “The tubular steel chair has been a classic since the emergence of Modernism”, says Höltje, “now, a century later, hydroforming allows us to take the next step and liberate the steel tube itself from its formal straightjacket”.

The Hydra chair reflects both the technical and aesthetic potential made possible by IHU technology and thanks to the close collaboration with the Fraunhofer IWU, Höltje has pioneered a whole new world of potential applications for the furniture industry.

Übersee magazine

A magazine prototype developed by Sven Ehmann, Nicolas Bourquin and Sophie Lovell for Die Gestalten publishers

“It’s time we started making statements again”

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Übersee was an experimental dummy/prototype for an international magazine dedicated to visual culture and inspiration. Its aim was to serve as a source book for the creative world. Übersee was about forcing diversity, provoking new questions and finding and creating disturbances. Its editorial dispensed with the usual boundaries between creative disciplines mixing prose, product, art, interviews, features music, graphics, collage, typography fashion, photography and performance – seeking new connections via clusters and coincidence rather than categories. The layered graphic design concept was equally groundbreaking. Sven Ehmann and Nicolas Bourquin later went on to do an acclaimed redesign of Domus magazine.

Qvest magazine

Architecture and Design Editor 2002-2004

From issue 4 in 2002 until issue 14 in 2004, Sophie Lovell was architecture and design editor of the pioneering Berlin-based magazine Qvest

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From issue 4 in 2002 until issue 14 in 2004 when this pioneering Berlin-based magazine had its throat cut for the first time, Sophie Lovell was architecture and design editor of Qvest. It was a great time for innovation in lifestyle publishing and the magazine managed to gain an international reputation on a shoestring budget thanks to a lot of effort and input by many talented and up-and-coming contributors, photographers and staff members. The daringly different spreads and cover artworks defied conventions and pushed boundaries – and not just in Germany. As a result Qvest was much imitated around the globe. It also won a whole bunch of Lead Awards and generally shook up the indigenous magazine industry – for a while at least.